Thomas Jefferson’s Enlightened View of Immigration

VDare took the opportunity upon the release of Lin Manuel Miranda’s great monument to cultural appropriators to point out that if Alexander Hamilton had gotten his way, Miranda would probably have lived as a nameless street-rat in Puerto Rico rather than the pampered son of one of Ed Koch’s diversity hires. In doing so, they published a rather scathing take-down written by Hamilton attacking his chief political enemy and favorite object of hatred, President Thomas Jefferson. It was quite a lot of fun and brilliantly executed on VDare’s part.

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The Three Principles

(Note: I suppose that this post could have been titled “Why the U.S.A. is Doomed”. I originally wrote and published this about six months ago. With all the recent public anti-racist virtue signaling that some American patriot types have done at Confederate monuments and online, I thought it might worth reposting here. The above picture shows some Southern patriots under George Rogers Clark who no doubt understood the Three Principles).

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Forging the Anchor Chain

I envy the Southern Nationalist who is well rooted in the land of his fathers and who knows his storied family history from the somber voices and wistful eyes of his grandparents.  To know the story of one’s people – to hear it directly from a dearly loved family elder – is to know who you are with a down-to-your-bones certainty.   It is the anchor of folk – the blessing of knowing precisely who you are in relation to a people.   I will never know that certainty for myself, and though the thought does not comfort me, I suspect that I am not alone.  The dark pall that came over all of our Southern families during the Civil War galvanized some and sent others into the kind of deep despair that only a defeated people can know.  For some the anchor chain linking us to our identity as a people was severed completely.

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Anarcho-Tyranny & The Overmountain Men

I would have rather lived in the 18th century. The Overmountain militiamen of “Watauga country” didn’t know the burdens of urbanization or the large populations, technology, and big government that accompany it. They did know the King’s antagonistic empire, but not the so entrenched and all-seeing governments we face now. The difference between the Overmountain men and the King’s Loyalists were numbers and assets, but the technology of their warfare was more of an even playing field than it is now, between modern man and our modern government.

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