Myth of the 20th Century: Aleister Crowley – Summoning the Demon

Born to a wealthy British family and the son of a preacher, Aleister Crowley, whom his mother called ‘The Beast’, became infamous later in life for his influence on the occult. Although Crowley was not, according to many religious scholars, a Satanist, his exploration of ancient Egyptian deities and adopting Baphomet’s name in a mystical rite in Berlin earned him a reputation for outlandishness and subversion. In addition to his published works on the occult, after his death in 1947 Crowley’s legacy extended into the Counter-Culture of the 1960s and the many secret societies that still dominate today.

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— References —

– The Book of the Law, Crowley (1904)
– The Book of Lies, Crowley (1912)
– The Book of Thoth, Crowley (1944)
– The Occult, Wilson (1971)
– Secret Agent 666, Spence (2008)
– Michael Alig: ‘We didn’t even realise he was dead’, Brockes (2014) – https://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/jun/21/michael-alig-interview
– Aleister Crowley: The Biography, Cherton (2011)

If pessimism is despair, optimism is cowardice and stupidity. -Francis Parker Yockey

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