Reviving the Southern Lexicon

Secession begins in the mind. If we are going to change the world, we must first change ourselves. And, the first step in the process of changing ourselves is changing the way we think.

One of the easiest ways to change how we think is to change how we speak. Our speech is more important than we often realize. The most common way to identify a Southerner is to simply wait and hear him talk. Our unique, smooth drawls are famous the world over. Yet, not only should how we talk set us apart, but also what we say. The vocabulary of our forefathers included words such as: duty, integrity, honor, independence, dignity, virtue, and character. When was the last time any of these words came up in one of your conversations, much less when you were describing someone? I feel as if we have somewhat dropped the ball on this in the past few generations. Some will blame this decline on foreign influence, others on our parents’ and grandparents’ lack of agency and discernment to prevent it.

Regardless of the cause, we must be the cure.

On the matter of foreign influence, one small and simple way to change the way we think and speak is to change what we consume for entertainment. The elites today constantly push degrading and lewd standards upon us. Gone are the days of George Jones singing “He Stopped Loving Her Today”, a ballad portraying love in one of its purest forms. Replaced instead with cheap auto tuned garbage glorifying hook up culture by the likes of Luke Bryan. Our bookstores are no longer lined with idyllic authors like Tolkien, now they peddle the trash of authors such as E. L. James. And, let us not even touch what has happened to television programming. Yes, I know its almost impossible to control everything we consume, but we must do our best and seek out what is pure and wholesome whenever possible.

If we are to be the generation that makes up the hedge and stands in the gap, we must do so on a strong spiritual and mental foundation. To find one of the best ways to lay this foundation we need only look to our ancestors and their use of scripture. As one of the building blocks of our early education system it no doubt helped shaped the way they thought and went about their daily life. Contrary to what we experience now, the government wasn’t always so diametrically opposed to the use of scripture in school. In fact, in 1844 the Supreme Court stated:

“Why may not the Bible, and especially the New Testament, without note or comment, be read and taught as a Divine revelation in the (school)-its general precepts expounded…and its glorious principles of morality inculcated…Where can the purest principles of morality be learned so clearly or so perfectly as from the New Testament? Where are benevolence, the love of truth, sobriety, and industry, so powerfully and irresistibly inculcated as in the Sacred Volume?”

If they felt the Bible was so necessary for their education, then how much more so is it for us? We must lay again this foundation upon which our ancestors used to conquer this land.

Herein lies the goal of “Reviving the Southern Lexicon,” I plan to take one word and spend an article breaking it down. Reminding us of what it means, what the Scriptures says about it and how it shaped the men we look back to for guidance in these troubled times. Yes I know this is a basic approach, but I also know it is one that is sorely needed. We cannot fall prey to the stereotypes the elites have put before us. Our identity must be more than mud riding, beer bottles and dip cans. It must be more than weekends playing golf and rooting for our favorite SEC team. It is time for us “Good Ole Boys” to stand up and start acting like men, time for us to restore our dignity, honor and sense of duty. But, before we can restore these things we must first understand them.

2 comments

  1. Language and dialect are incredibly important factors in one’s ethnic identity and in his perceived ethnicity by others. It’s encouraging to see others point it out. We must double down on our language or we will lose it in due time.