Home and History

As you crest a small hill you’ll see a two-story farm house on the right. At this moment, most people would be looking for a spot to turn around and get back on the main road, but I’m turning into my driveway. The house is old, 1916 stamped in the foundation, but county records show 1889. The locals call it The Malone’s Place, but I call it home.

It’s surrounded by fields and overlooks what used to be a cow pasture. There’s a tin barn that sits across the street that used to be a hog house. You can see hoof prints in the concrete floor and the wooden posts are worn by years of hogs rubbing against them. There’s a ’56 Massey Ferguson tractor in it now with a few attachments, we still use it to this day.

There used to be an old store known as Malone’s store, this was before my father’s time, so I don’t know much about it. I’d imagine it was an old general store, in its time the house was envied because it had a telephone and cream separator. I guess those were exciting things in that day.  It was a wedding gift from my great grandparents to my grandparents and they lived in it all their life. When they passed away the house was given to me.

The house has seen several tornadoes, fires and other things that have torn surrounding buildings down. It’s solid, but its age is showing. You can watch the sunrise on the front porch and watch it set on the back porch, I’m sure this was done on purpose. It’s two stories with a tin roof and a dormer in the middle. We’re excited to bring this house back to its former glory and pass it on to the next generation.

Behind the house and across the field, just inside the woods, sits a four-room cinder block house we call the tenant house. Now, it’s a good spot to hunt around. There’s a lot of Southern history in the area, not even a mile up the road is an old church. It’s white with a very tall and very steep steeple. It’s the typical one room church that most would imagine. During the War of Northern Aggression, the church was used as a hospital. I could only imagine the stories its walls could tell.

To the left of the church is a Confederate cemetery, several battle flags still fly and the locals replace them as needed. It makes me proud to know that people still care enough to do that. To a lot of us, this is the resting place of our ancestors.

While most people would pass this place frustrated because they can’t get a cell phone signal and they’re undoubtedly lost, I’m starting to slow down.

This is not only my home, but this is my history.

-By Lee

Oh, I'm a good old Rebel, now that's just what I am;
For this "Fair Land of Freedom" I do not give a damn!
I'm glad I fit against it, I only wish we'd won,
And I don't want no pardon for anything I done.

3 comments

  1. It sounds like a glorious place, you’re one lucky man to have the opportunity to bring it back to its glory. I love places like this.